Issue Based

Philanthropy Northwest Network Call - The Impact of Wildfires Across the Northwest

Philanthropy Northwest Network Call - The Impact of Wildfires Across the Northwest

Event banner for Philanthropy Northwest Network Call with icon of three people talking

Event details

Friday, October 15, 2021
10:00am to 11:00am PDT
Virtual

About this event

As many of us across the globe are becoming increasingly aware of the ever-present effects of climate change, here in the Northwest we are contending with this reality, in the form of wildfires (among other things). This is not new, but they are becoming more and more prevalent across our beautiful landscapes, impacting our lands, our people and our homes.

On this call, we will go deeper into this topic and hear from speakers who work with and for communities often impacted the most. We’ll hear from Tyson Bertone-Riggs from Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition about how policy change is reducing the risk of wildfire and protecting both rural and urban communities. Marko Bey and Belinda Brown from the Lomakatsi Restoration Project will share about their work developing and implementing forest and watershed restoration projects in Oregon and Northern California, and specifically the work they do with tribal communities. Molly Mowery from the Community Wildfire Planning Center will tell us about their work related to development in wildfire-prone areas and implications for affordable housing, public safety and more. 

Speakers

Tyson Bertone-Riggs, Coalition Director, Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition

Tyson Bertone-Riggs serves as the Coalition Director for the Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition (RVCC), having previously held the position of Policy Analyst with the group for the last three years. Tyson’s work focuses on federal land management policy, particularly related to the US Forest Service. Prior to joining RVCC, Tyson’s prior work experience included state and federal land management agencies, including the Oregon Department of Forestry and six seasons with the US Forest Service on forests across the West. He grew up in Western Oregon and earned dual bachelor’s degrees in geography and political science from the University of Oregon and a master’s degree in forestry from Oregon State University with a focus on federal land management policy and social science.
 

Marko Bey, Executive Director & Co-Founder, Lomakatsi Restoration Project

Marko is the Founder and Executive Director of the Lomakatsi Restoration Project lomakatsi.org. Lomakatsi’s ten regional ecosystem restoration programs and associated workforce initiatives are a primary result of his work. Marko has over 30 years of experience working in forestry and ecosystem restoration, from the ground up, working across six western states. Most essential has been his leadership in the orchestration and formation of collaborative partnerships including federal and state agencies, Native American tribes, organizations, industry, private landowners, and community members. Working locally, regionally, and nationally to advance the full spectrum of ecosystem restoration, green job creation, and forest-based community revitalization —Marko participates in a variety of strategic coalitions, committees, and interdisciplinary teams, both regionally and nationally.

 

Belinda Brown, Tribal Partnership Director, Lomakatsi Restoration Project

Belinda serves as Lomakatsi’s Tribal Partnership Director and operates within the framework of Lomakatsi’s Tribal Partnership Program and associated initiatives. Belinda works closely with Lomakatsi’s Executive Director and staff leadership to serve tribal communities in their efforts to restore forests and watersheds on tribal trust and ancestral lands. She serves as a community liaison, engaging with tribal elders, tribal councils, cultural resource monitors, and tribal department staff. Belinda also works to establish and promote effective working relationships among the tribal community, Lomakatsi and federal agencies, and non-profit partners. Belinda is an enrolled member of the Kosealekte Band of the Ajumawi-Atsuge Nation (Pit River Tribe) and has served as an elected official on the Pit River Tribal Council and Cultural Representative as an appointed delegate at local, state, and national levels. She has served Indian Country in intergovernmental affairs coordination, strategic planning, and community development for the last thirty years.

 

Molly Mowery, Executive Director, Community Wildfire Planning Center

Molly Mowery serves as executive director for the Community Wildfire Planning Center, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping communities prepare for, adapt to and recover from wildfires. Molly is also the founder of the consulting firm Wildfire Planning International. For more than 15 years, Molly has been a pioneer in integrating wildfire hazard mitigation with land use planning practices. She developed the first wildland-urban interface planning course for FEMA, served as the lead author of the American Planning Association (APA) publication Planning the Wildland-Urban Interface and drafted land use planning guidance for National Research Council Canada’s recent National Guide for Wildland-Urban interface Fires. Molly is a certified planner with the American Institute of Planners and is chair-elect of APA’s Hazard Mitigation and Disaster Recovery Division. She earned a bachelor's degree from Naropa University and a master's degree in city planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Eligibility 

Participation in this meeting is open to philanthropic organizations that currently make grants. This includes corporate giving offices, private and public foundations, community foundations, government grantmakers and CDFI institutions with a philanthropic focus. You do not need to be a Philanthropy Northwest member to participate, but do need to represent an organizational philanthropic institution. Please do not join this call if you are a nonprofit organization. If you are unsure about your eligibility, please contact JulieAnne Behar.