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October 2016 |

Founded in 1976 — the same year as Philanthropy Northwest — the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust has awarded more 6,000 grants, totaling more than $863 million, to organizations in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington  and beyond since 1976.

October 2016 |

On behalf of our interim board of directors, it is my pleasure to introduce Philanthropy Northwest's network to Group Health Community Foundation. GHCF’s formation as a 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization is one component of the proposed acquisition of Group Health Cooperative by Kaiser Permanente. If the acquisition is approved by Washington state regulators and completed, Kaiser Permanente will provide approximately $1.8 billion to fund this new health foundation. We look forward to deepening our connections within the Philanthropy Northwest network in the coming years.

September 2016 |

A consortium of five northwest state nonprofit associations has released a comprehensive study on the capacity, strengths, and challenges of the region’s nonprofit sector. The 2016 Northwest Nonprofit Capacity Report: Our Strengths — Our Challenges — Our Resilience, developed using survey data from more than 1,000 nonprofits in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington, highlights the progress nonprofits are making in creating a resilient sector.

September 2016 |

Bank of America has announced $329,150 in grants across 25 nonprofits working to increase educational and workforce development opportunities in the Portland, Oregon community. These grants are part of the bank’s broader philanthropic commitment to helping individuals and families improve their economic stability.

August 2016 |

This summer, Rasmuson Foundation announced $2.7 million in grants for programs across Alaska, including funds for Blood Bank of Alaska, the state's first Ronald McDonald House and Bristol Bay Native Association.

August 2016 |

Like other youth of color, Native American and Alaska Natives in cities and communities across the United States face challenges. Natives Americans have endured a history of racism and colonialism that has resulted in multi-generational trauma. Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among Native youth between the ages of 15 and 24 — and that rate is two and a half times the national average. Native youth are five times more likely to end up in the criminal justice system than whites, where they receive disproportionately harsher sentences, and are more likely to be killed by police than any other racial group. Moreover, Native Americans are often categorized in data and reports as "statistically insignificant" or "other," erasing their very existence as a disadvantaged minority. As a result, too many programs, policies, and systems — not to mention philanthropy — ignore or overlook them. I urge philanthropy to see the tremendous potential in our Native communities. And I extend an invitation to all grantmakers to join us at the White House on August 26 for Generation Indigenous: Raising Impact With Innovation and Proven Strategies, where we will seek to engage the philanthropic community in a dialogue about expanding support for Native youth.

August 2016 |

The Pacific Hospital Preservation & Development Authority announced more than $3.1 million in grants to 20 community agencies working to improve health care access and outcomes in King County, Washington.